Seven-Pointed Something or Other

Seshat with Measuring cords

Seshat with Measuring cords

Seshat is one of my favorite goddesses. She rules over writing, architecture, libraries, building trades, astronomy, astrology and mathermatics. Although subsumed into Thoth as the patriarchies blended into older religions, she was the lady of the Library, the one who knew how to find true north when the north star was not aligned, and the one who recorded the deeds of the pharaoh for posterity.

Her symbol is a seven-pointed (star? flower? marijuana leaf? branches of knowledge? beanie?) something or other, still unknown despite various theories.  She is often shown notching a palm leaf to record events, or with the measuring cord that was used to lay out temples. She is dressed in the leopard skin of the funeral priests, with the spots representing the stars in the sky. Builders often left tools as offerings for her in the foundations of their structures.

Seshat Collage

Seshat Collage with large image of her symbol, a blue lotus, and relief of her marking her palm leaf. I assembled this image.

Sources:

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutube
This entry was posted in Babbling, Mythology, Sevens, Ultimate Blog Challenge and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Seven-Pointed Something or Other

  1. Cheryl Cope says:

    Moses’ God, Jehovah (pre-incarnate Jesus) pretty much defeated all those Egyptian gods thousands of years ago. My favorite God is the Lord Jesus Christ, His Father and His Holy Spirit (ONE God, three persons).

  2. That is very interesting. Thank you for sharing.

  3. Her symbol is a seven-pointed (star? flower? marijuana leaf? branches of knowledge? beanie?) something or other, still unknown despite various theories. She is often shown notching a palm leaf to record events, or with the measuring cord that was used to lay out temples. She is dressed in the leopard skin of the funeral priests, with the spots representing the stars in the sky. Builders often left tools as offerings for her in the foundations of their structures.

  4. Charlotte, it is so good to see your blog! I enjoyed these Egyptian 7’s. Do you ever get out to Pacifica these days?

  5. Carol, I’m glad to hear from you. I hope you are doing well. I haven’t been back to pacifica since graduation in 2008. I’ve seen some interesting programs but nothing so compelling that I decided to invest. The Jags are semi-planning a reunion next year some time probably on the west coast.

  6. The creation stories built into the pharaonic signs for the powers of ten demonstrate now clearly that the famous doctrine “Number is the principle, the source, and the root of all things” dates back to the beginnings of hieroglyphic writing, and that Pythagoras had learned it from the Egyptians, at a time halfway between us and the numeral designer(s) who had first recorded the ancient beliefs about the nature of numbers in a few simple symbols their followers used daily from then on.